Transalpina Sunrise 1 on Flickr.Rânca is a recently developed Romanian resort, located at 1,600 m (5,250 ft) elevation, at the foothill of Păpuşa Peak in the Parâng Mountains.
It is located 17.9 kilometers away from Novaci, after passing on the Transalpina (DN 67C) road through the Parâng Mountains. There are views of the Parângu Mare peak and, when the weather is clear, one can see Peleaga peak of the Retezat Mountains.

Transalpina Sunrise 1 on Flickr.

Rânca is a recently developed Romanian resort, located at 1,600 m (5,250 ft) elevation, at the foothill of Păpuşa Peak in the Parâng Mountains.

It is located 17.9 kilometers away from Novaci, after passing on the Transalpina (DN 67C) road through the Parâng Mountains. There are views of the Parângu Mare peak and, when the weather is clear, one can see Peleaga peak of the Retezat Mountains.

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usabin:

The Pantheon on Flickr.
The Pantheon (an adjective meaning “to every god”) is a building in Rome, Italy, commissioned by Marcus Agrippa as a temple to all the gods of Ancient Rome, and rebuilt by Emperor Hadrian in about 126 AD.] The ancient Roman writer Cassius Dio speculated that the name comes either from the statues of so many gods placed around this building or from the resemblance of the dome to the heavens. Since the French Revolution, when the church of Sainte-Geneviève in Paris, France was deconsecrated and turned into the secular monument called the Panthéon of Paris, the generic term pantheon has sometimes been applied to other buildings in which illustrious dead are honored or buried.

usabin:

The Pantheon on Flickr.

The Pantheon (an adjective meaning “to every god”) is a building in Rome, Italy, commissioned by Marcus Agrippa as a temple to all the gods of Ancient Rome, and rebuilt by Emperor Hadrian in about 126 AD.] The ancient Roman writer Cassius Dio speculated that the name comes either from the statues of so many gods placed around this building or from the resemblance of the dome to the heavens. Since the French Revolution, when the church of Sainte-Geneviève in Paris, France was deconsecrated and turned into the secular monument called the Panthéon of Paris, the generic term pantheon has sometimes been applied to other buildings in which illustrious dead are honored or buried.

Plitvice Waterfall 3 on Flickr.Plitvice Lakes National Park lies in the Plitvice plateau which is surrounded by three mountains part of the Dinaric Alps : Plješevica mountain (Gornja Plješevica peak 1,640 m) and the Mala Kapela mountain (Seliški Vrh peak at 1,280 m) and Medveđak (884 m).
The lakes are separated by natural dams of travertine, which is deposited by the action of moss, algae and bacteria. The encrusted plants and bacteria accumulate on top of each other, forming travertine barriers which grow at the rate of about 1 cm per year.

Plitvice Waterfall 3 on Flickr.

Plitvice Lakes National Park lies in the Plitvice plateau which is surrounded by three mountains part of the Dinaric Alps : Plješevica mountain (Gornja Plješevica peak 1,640 m) and the Mala Kapela mountain (Seliški Vrh peak at 1,280 m) and Medveđak (884 m).
The lakes are separated by natural dams of travertine, which is deposited by the action of moss, algae and bacteria. The encrusted plants and bacteria accumulate on top of each other, forming travertine barriers which grow at the rate of about 1 cm per year.

Piazza Navona on Flickr.Piazza Navona is a city square in Rome, Italy. It is built on the site of the Stadium of Domitian, built in 1st century AD, and follows the form of the open space of the stadium. The ancient Romans came there to watch the agones (“games”), and hence it was known as ‘Circus Agonalis’ (competition arena). It is believed that over time the name changed to ‘in agone’ to ‘navone’ and eventually to ‘navona’.

Piazza Navona on Flickr.

Piazza Navona is a city square in Rome, Italy. It is built on the site of the Stadium of Domitian, built in 1st century AD, and follows the form of the open space of the stadium. The ancient Romans came there to watch the agones (“games”), and hence it was known as ‘Circus Agonalis’ (competition arena). It is believed that over time the name changed to ‘in agone’ to ‘navone’ and eventually to ‘navona’.